CVE-2023-29552

A new high-severity vulnerability known as CVE-2023-29552 has been discovered in the Service Location Protocol (SLP), which allows an unauthenticated remote attacker to register arbitrary services. This could enable the attacker to use spoofed UDP traffic to conduct a denial-of-service attack with a significant amplification factor. The vulnerability was disclosed on April 25th, 2023, and has the potential to impact business continuity and result in financial loss, even if an attacker has limited resources.

Organizations must implement appropriate security measures to safeguard their networks and servers from being used in such attacks. One effective way to protect against SLP vulnerabilities is by disabling SLP where it is not needed. VMware has investigated this vulnerability and determined that currently supported ESXi releases (ESXi 7.x and 8.x lines) are not impacted. However, other systems may still be vulnerable to this attack.

Understanding CVE-2023-29552 is crucial for organizations to protect their networks and servers from being exploited. This article will provide an overview of the vulnerability and its potential impact, as well as recommendations for mitigating the risk of this attack.

Key Takeaways

  • CVE-2023-29552 is a high-severity vulnerability in the Service Location Protocol (SLP) that can potentially impact business continuity and result in financial loss.
  • Organizations must implement appropriate security measures to safeguard their networks and servers from being used in such attacks, including disabling SLP where it is not needed.
  • VMware has investigated this vulnerability and determined that currently supported ESXi releases (ESXi 7.x and 8.x lines) are not impacted, but other systems may still be vulnerable to this attack.

Understanding CVE-2023-29552

CVE-2023-29552 is a high-severity vulnerability that affects the Service Location Protocol (SLP) and was first disclosed on April 25th, 2023. The vulnerability allows an unauthenticated, remote attacker to register arbitrary services, which could enable the attacker to use spoofed UDP traffic to conduct a denial-of-service (DoS) attack with a significant amplification factor. This threat can potentially impact business continuity and result in financial loss, even if an attacker has limited resources.

The Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) has assigned a score of 7.5 to CVE-2023-29552, indicating that it is a high-severity vulnerability. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has also published a detailed description of the vulnerability, including its impact, severity, and affected products.

Organizations must implement appropriate security measures to safeguard their networks and servers from being used in such attacks. One effective way to protect against SLP vulnerabilities is by using network segmentation to isolate SLP traffic and prevent it from being used to launch a DoS attack.

According to BitSight, a leading cybersecurity ratings company, CVE-2023-29552 is a threat that can potentially impact business continuity and result in financial loss, even if an attacker has limited resources. Organizations must take proactive measures to prevent such attacks from occurring.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has also issued a security advisory on CVE-2023-29552, urging organizations to review the vulnerability and take appropriate action to mitigate the risk. CISA recommends that organizations apply software patches or workarounds to address the vulnerability and monitor their networks for any signs of suspicious activity.

Service Location Protocol (SLP)

The Service Location Protocol (SLP) is a protocol used to discover and locate services in a network. It is defined in RFC 2608 and RFC 2165. SLP is a Dynamic Configuration Mechanism that enables the Global Resolution System to locate services in Local Area Networks (LANs) and Enterprise Networks.

Basics of SLP

SLP is used to advertise and discover services in a network. Services can be anything from printers to web servers. SLP uses IP and UDP as its transport protocols. SLP can be used to discover services on both authenticated and unauthenticated networks.

SLP in Enterprise Networks

SLP is commonly used in Enterprise Networks to discover services. However, SLP can also be used by attackers to register arbitrary services on the network. This can lead to an amplification factor that can be used to conduct a Denial-of-Service (DoS) attack.

SLP and Authentication

SLP does not provide any authentication mechanism. This means that anyone can register services on the network. This makes SLP vulnerable to attacks.

SLP in VMware

VMware has investigated the vulnerability in SLP that could allow for a reflective DoS amplification attack. Currently supported ESXi releases (ESXi 7.x and 8.x lines) are not impacted by the CVE-2023-29552 vulnerability.

SLP in NetApp

NetApp products are also affected by the CVE-2023-29552 vulnerability. NetApp has released a security advisory that outlines the affected releases and remediation measures.

SLP and UDP Traffic

SLP uses UDP traffic to advertise and discover services. Spoofed UDP traffic can be used to conduct a DoS attack with a significant amplification factor.

SLP and DoS Attack

The CVE-2023-29552 vulnerability in SLP can be used to conduct a DoS attack. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can register arbitrary services and use spoofed UDP traffic to conduct the attack.

Disabling SLP

To protect against CVE-2023-29552, SLP should be disabled on all systems running on untrusted networks, like those directly connected to the Internet. If that is not possible, then firewalls should be configured to filter traffic on UDP and TCP port 427.

Measures and Precautions

CureSec recommends the following measures to protect against CVE-2023-29552:

  • Disable SLP on all systems running on untrusted networks.
  • Configure firewalls to filter traffic on UDP and TCP port 427.
  • Apply the remediation measures outlined by NetApp for their affected products.

NVD and CVE-2023-29552

The National Vulnerability Database (NVD) has listed CVE-2023-29552 as a vulnerability that allows an unauthenticated, remote attacker to register arbitrary services. This could allow the attacker to use spoofed UDP traffic to conduct a DoS attack with a significant amplification factor.

This concludes the section on SLP and its vulnerability to CVE-2023-29552.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is CVE-2023-29552 and how does it impact IBM products?

CVE-2023-29552 is a high-severity vulnerability discovered in the Service Location Protocol (SLP), which allows an unauthenticated remote attacker to register arbitrary services. This could allow the attacker to conduct a denial-of-service attack with a significant amplification factor. IBM products that use SLP are impacted by this vulnerability.

How can Red Hat users protect themselves against CVE-2023-29552?

Red Hat users can protect themselves against CVE-2023-29552 by applying the relevant patches provided by Red Hat. Red Hat has released patches for affected products, and users are advised to update their systems as soon as possible.

What is the CVSS score for CVE-2023-29552?

The CVSS score for CVE-2023-29552 is 7.5, which is considered high severity.

Which versions of Linux are affected by CVE-2023-29552?

All versions of Linux that use SLP are potentially affected by CVE-2023-29552. However, patches are available for most affected Linux distributions, and users are advised to update their systems as soon as possible.

What is the latest vulnerability discovered in 2023?

CVE-2023-29552 is one of the latest vulnerabilities discovered in 2023. It was discovered on April 25th, 2023.

What is CVE-2023-20869 and how does it differ from CVE-2023-29552?

CVE-2023-20869 is a high-severity vulnerability discovered in the Linux kernel that allows a local attacker to cause a denial-of-service condition. It differs from CVE-2023-29552 as it requires local access to the system, whereas CVE-2023-29552 can be exploited remotely.